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popculturebrain:

HBO Apologizes for George W Bush’s Alleged Decapitated Head in Game of Thrones | io9

minusmanhattan:

Burnouts by Simon Davidson.

betterbooktitles:

Stephenie Meyers

Reader Submission: Title and Redesign by Kristyn Winch (http://kristyndw.tumblr.com/)

betterbooktitles:

Stephenie Meyers

Reader Submission: Title and Redesign by Kristyn Winch (http://kristyndw.tumblr.com/)

the homohelp network is coming this week!

homohelper:

We are so excited for this. We hope you all like what’s coming.

cozydark:

Did Exploding Stars Help Life On Earth Thrive? |
Research by a Danish physicist suggests that the explosion of massive stars — supernovae — near the Solar System has strongly influenced the development of life. Prof. Henrik Svensmark of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) sets out his novel work in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
When the most massive stars exhaust their available fuel and reach the end of their lives, they explode as supernovae, tremendously powerful explosions that are briefly brighter than an entire galaxy of normal stars. The remnants of these dramatic events also release vast numbers of high-energy charged particles known as galactic cosmic rays (GCR). If a supernova is close enough to the Solar System, the enhanced GCR levels can have a direct impact on the atmosphere of Earth.
Prof. Svensmark looked back through 500 million years of geological and astronomical data and considered the proximity of the Sun to supernovae as it moves around our Galaxy, the Milky Way. In particular, when the Sun is passing through the spiral arms of the Milky Way, it encounters newly forming clusters of stars. These so-called open clusters, which disperse over time, have a range of ages and sizes and will have started with a small proportion of stars massive enough to explode as supernovae. From the data on open clusters, Prof. Svensmark was able to deduce how the rate at which supernovae exploded near the Solar System varied over time. continue reading

cozydark:

Did Exploding Stars Help Life On Earth Thrive? |

Research by a Danish physicist suggests that the explosion of massive stars — supernovae — near the Solar System has strongly influenced the development of life. Prof. Henrik Svensmark of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) sets out his novel work in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

When the most massive stars exhaust their available fuel and reach the end of their lives, they explode as supernovae, tremendously powerful explosions that are briefly brighter than an entire galaxy of normal stars. The remnants of these dramatic events also release vast numbers of high-energy charged particles known as galactic cosmic rays (GCR). If a supernova is close enough to the Solar System, the enhanced GCR levels can have a direct impact on the atmosphere of Earth.

Prof. Svensmark looked back through 500 million years of geological and astronomical data and considered the proximity of the Sun to supernovae as it moves around our Galaxy, the Milky Way. In particular, when the Sun is passing through the spiral arms of the Milky Way, it encounters newly forming clusters of stars. These so-called open clusters, which disperse over time, have a range of ages and sizes and will have started with a small proportion of stars massive enough to explode as supernovae. From the data on open clusters, Prof. Svensmark was able to deduce how the rate at which supernovae exploded near the Solar System varied over time. continue reading

materialkillers:

True Blood Season 5 Promo - June 10th.

materialkillers:

True Blood Season 5 Promo - June 10th.

davesingh:

Understanding the atmosphere.

davesingh:

Understanding the atmosphere.

jaymug:

Coca-Cola Aluminium Recycle Concept

jaymug:

Coca-Cola Aluminium Recycle Concept